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Prehistoric Copper Under 100 Year Maple

By: Gregory g.


On a pleasant warm summer day, I arrived home from work early. I was pondering my afternoon metal detecting trip and my wife asked, ""When are we going to try the old wayside park?"" I figured well why not tonight? It was a short 15 minute ride down the road. On the way there I thought about what treasures or trash I may find. I pulled into the park and unloaded my Minelab Equinox 800 and strapped on my sweet military toolbelt equipped with my Garrett pro-pointer, grave digger hand digger, and my favorite Kellyco finds pouch. All purchased from Kellyco! I began swinging the coil around all of the hotspots like park benches and grills, only to find pull tabs and can slaw. At this point I wished I would have brought along my Minelab 6 inch coil too work through all the trash targets. I decided to shift gears thinking the walk way to the restroom may hold some coins. As I started along the vintage path in this vintage wayside now a town park, I started getting some coin signals. Most were all modern clad coins except a 1922d wheat cent which is a great find. The trail quickly fizzled out. I turned my attention to the large maple trees that looked to be at least 100 years old. I found a set of keys, more pull tabs, and miscellaneous hardware. I was feeling discouraged, but it was too late to go anywhere else. As I was detecting back towards the car I circled the last tree, the Equinox chirped loudly with a 39 on the display. In my experience so far a 39 was some kind of large sheet metal or garbage. I hoped for a silver US half dollar. I cut a nice plug next to the old maple and peered down the hole. I didn't see anything so I prodded around with the pro-pointer. It was still a bit deeper. I carefully removed another 4 to 5 inches of soil and again looked down in the hole using the pro-pointer's flashlight function. I could make out something green. It wasn't a coin and wasn't the sheet metal that I expected. As I gently retrieved the unknown item, I asked myself what is this thick heavy piece of copper doing here. My wife Sarah asked what I was finding and I told her she just some kind of old copper. When I said old copper I thought of the old copper culture native Americans that once lived in our area. So I gently brushed off the rest of the loose dirt and discovered I was holding a 7000 year old native American copper artifact. I'm so happy with this find. Never give up on a spot until you have covered everything is what I learned.

Prehistoric Copper Implement with Green Patina Across Surface Held in a Hand with Grassy Park and Tree Blurry in Background Prehistoric Copper Implement with Green Patina Across Surface Held in a Hand with Grassy Park and Tree Blurry in Background Prehistoric Copper Implement with Green Patina Across Surface Held in a Hand with Grassy Park and Tree Blurry in Background Prehistoric Copper Implement with Green Patina Across Surface Sat on Paper Towel with Hand Laid Flat Beneath it to Show the Size Prehistoric Copper Implement with Green Patina Across Surface Showing End Edge Resting On Paper Towel in Background