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Simmons Scientific Products

Long Range Locators
Directional Locating Instruments for
Precious Metals & Minerals

These lightweight, powerful instruments can be used to search for large or very small treasures. The antenna length can be adjusted according to whether you are looking for close by or distant targets. You shorten the antenna if you want to find only sources of attraction that lie close by and extend the antenna when searching for more distant targets. You can use the instruments for both short and long range work when the antenna is fully extended.  It can be used to search for specific metals or minerals by installing a sample of that metal or mineral in the sample compartment. Each is individually built...not mass produced. All the Simmons Scientific directional locating instruments listed are "self potential", which means they do not rely upon outside sources (batteries) for power. It can be used to search for specific metals or minerals by installing a sample of that metal or mineral in the sample compartment.

Long Range Locators
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TITAN II PENDULUM
Cat# 778-TII

Retail Price $295.00
Sale Price $236.95
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UNIVERSAL ANTENNA ROD
Cat# 778-UAR

Retail Price $895.00
Sale Price $716.95
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UNIVERSAL DEPTH ROD
Cat# 778-UDR

Retail Price $695.00
Sale Price $556.95
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Precision Master Rod
Cat# 778-PMR

Retail Price $1,395.00
Sale Price $1,109.95
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Precision Master Rod II
Cat# 778-PMRII

Retail Price $2,095.00
Sale Price $1,676.95
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Precision Master Rod III
Cat# 778-PMRIII

Retail Price $2,995.00
Sale Price $2,295.95
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Triangulation

A Method of approximating the location of and estimating the distance
to a source of metal or mineral attraction

Method #1 - When you pick up an attraction and determine in what direction the source of the attracting lies, make a line on the ground to show that direction. Then move over about 100 feet at right angles to the direction indicated. Take another reading and mark that direction on the ground. If there is an obvious difference in the direction of the two lines, the source is nearby (less than 100 yards) and you can estimate about where the point is that the two lines would cross, where they extended, this is where the source of the attraction will be found.

Method #2 - If the source lies at a greater distance, the difference in the directions of the two readings will not be too noticeable. In such a case, take a good compass reading to note the direction of the attraction. Then move over at approximately right angles to the direction of the attraction, a distance of several hundred yards or a mile or so, and take another reading on the direction of the attraction. Using a protractor, you will then plot the two directions on a map or aerial photo of the area as shown below.

The area where the two lines cross is where the source of the attraction would be found. To use this second method, you will need to take accurate readings from both your locating instrument and from your compass. Your calculations will be only as accurate as are these readings. Use of this method will direct you to the immediate area where a treasure, whose attraction you have detected from a long distance, lies. It is then a simple matter, using your locator to pinpoint it.